The Latest: Budget, debt deal clears Senate, heads to Trump

President Donald Trump walks to speak to media as before departing the White House in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019, for the the short trip to Andrews Air Force Base, Md., and on to a campaign rally in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., accompanied by Sharon Soderstrom, his chief of staff, smiles after a vote on a hard-won budget deal that would permit the government to resume borrowing to pay all of its obligations and would remove the prospect of a government shutdown in October, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., left, joins Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., as she signs the budget package just passed in the Senate to permit the government to resume borrowing to pay all of its obligations and would remove the prospect of a government shutdown in October, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON — The Latest on legislation dealing with the federal budget and the government's borrowing limit (all times local):

12:13 p.m.

A bipartisan budget and debt deal has passed the Senate and is heading to the White House for President Donald Trump's signature.

Thursday's vote addresses a worrisome set of Washington deadlines as Trump's allies and adversaries set aside ideology in exchange for relative fiscal peace and stability.

The measure would permit the government to resume borrowing to pay all its bills and would set an overall $1.37 trillion limit on agency budgets approved by Congress annually. It also would remove the prospect of a government shutdown in October and automatic spending cuts.

But a tea party senator, Republican Rand Paul of Kentucky, says the legislation really is a spectacular failure because it will add hundreds of billions of dollars to the country's spiraling debt.

___

9:50 a.m.

President Donald Trump and his Senate GOP allies are relying on lots of Democratic votes to propel a hard-won budget and debt deal to the finish line.

Passage of the measure Thursday would mark a drama-free solution to a worrisome set of Washington deadlines. It also would that Trump's allies and adversaries were able to set aside ideology in exchange for relative fiscal peace and stability.

The Senate vote expected later Thursday would send the legislation to Trump for his promised signature.

The measure would permit the government to resume borrowing to pay all its obligations and sets an overall $1.37 trillion limit on agency budgets approved by Congress every year.

It would remove any prospect of a government shutdown in October or the return of automatic spending cuts.

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